Gardens of War & Wasteland

welcome to whyt’hallen 02: character interview – amikharlia

September is upon us and that means a new instalment of WELCOME TO WHYT’HALLEN. In this month’s edition, we sit down for a Q&A with the Gardens of War & Wasteland protagonist herself—Princess Amikharlia Elys Holani.

First, let’s kick things off with a mood board!

THE LOST PRINCESS—AMIKHARLIA: Unaccepting of the life laid out before her, Amika runs away from the Holanian capital of Adria to forge her own path—and seek answers for her darkest secrets. Images via canva.com
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Gardens of War & Wasteland

welcome to whyt’hallen 01: the old capital – ciraselo

In this month’s edition of WELCOME TO WHYT’HALLEN, we take a look at Ciraselo, the Old Capital. All the action of Gardens of War & Wasteland Book I: The Ruptured Sky begins here, making it the perfect choice for your first glimpse into the world of Whyt’hallen.

THE OLD CAPITAL—CIRASELO: Creating mood boards has been a fantastic world building exercise that helps me visualise the architecture and atmosphere of the locales visited in The Ruptured Sky. Images via canva.com
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Blog, Gardens of War & Wasteland

what you need to know about gardens of war & wasteland: the ruptured sky

So I’ve finished my novel. Now what?

While I sit and wait for feedback from my beta readers, I’ve put together a comprehensive guide to the world of Whyt’hallen and everything you need to know about the upcoming Gardens of War & Wasteland Book I: The Ruptured Sky.

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Book Reviews

the raven cycle

Never had I been so invested in a group of teenagers until I met Blue and her Raven Boys.

Ah, Maggie Stiefvater and The Raven Cycle.

Where do I begin without obscenely gushing all over the place? This series has raised the bar for YA fiction and given me a love for the genre which was previously only an occasional interest. Having annihilated all four books in the space of a month—a truly astounding feat for turtle-reader me—it’s safe to say The Raven Cycle shot straight to the top of my favourites and Stiefvater has well asserted herself as one of the premier authors of YA fiction.

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Short Stories

aunty mim’s lost & found

Miriam Sykes had been called many things and not all of them were kind. A witch, a gypsy. Hermit. Lunatic. Satan. But Miriam Sykes was just a woman—a woman who was very good at finding things.

Miriam lived a good twenty minute walk from Sturtville station. Trains didn’t stop there anymore. Well, not trains for moving people anyhow. There weren’t many people left to move in bum-fuck nowhere South Australia. That’s what my brother called Sturtville: bum-fuck nowhere. He wasn’t exactly wrong. Sturtville consisted of opal miners, a high school of about fifty kids, a Woolies, and one sad little servo that sold over-priced fuel. That was our town. Village. Hole-in-the-ground. We didn’t have a lot in Sturtville (more than one doctor, for example) but there was one thing we had that no other place in Australia did. And that was Miriam Sykes.

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Blog

the year that was & the year that will be

And so 2017 draws to a close. I for one can not be more relieved.

This year has been a tumultuous one indeed: I moved countries, got married, began a new day-job, bought my first car, and moved again (domestically this time); I said goodbye to my Grandmother, a second mother who raised me alongside my own; and lost two public figures (Chester Bennington and Kim Jonghyun), who have been a source of love, comfort and inspiration, to this terrible illness called depression, of which I also chronically suffer. It really has been all over the place—I have been all over the place. Personal rollercoaster aside, though, and my writing career(?) has been a pleasantly stable fixture. Let’s take a look.

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Book Reviews

the darkest part of the forest

Holly Black takes something so ordinary, so relatable to the modern adolescent, and juxtaposes it against the profoundly extraordinary.

darkestpart
Stunning cover art is just one of the many positives about this book.

After a dismal run of DNF and one-star reads, Holly Black‘s The Darkest Part of the Forest was a pure delight. I have to confess, ten years ago, I never would have picked up this book: I was strictly a high-fantasy or slice-of-life contemporary literature kind of girl. I had no interest in magical realism or the blurring of lines between our world and others. What a wonderful thing personal growth is!

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