Short Stories

the carpet cleaner

The Carpet Cleaner

 

Robert liked his job. Well, most of the time. He didn’t like going to uni student share houses to leech booze and dried vomit off every plush surface the day before a rental inspection; and he didn’t like going to Ms McTavish’s place because she had ten cats and let them pee on the carpet until it was sodden and the house smelt like piss long after he’d shampooed and shampooed it again. He also didn’t like nursing homes, because it was too hard seeing people not that much older than he with defeated expressions on their sunken faces, confined to beds, stuck full of tubes and left to stare at the empty visitors’ chairs in their room all day. No, he didn’t like that at all. As with anything, there were good clients and bad, and the one client Robert loved, more than anything, was Mrs Lavingston.  Continue reading “the carpet cleaner”

Short Stories

aunty mim’s lost & found

Miriam Sykes had been called many things and not all of them were kind. A witch, a gypsy. Hermit. Lunatic. Satan. But Miriam Sykes was just a woman—a woman who was very good at finding things.

Miriam lived a good twenty minute walk from Sturtville station. Trains didn’t stop there anymore. Well, not trains for moving people anyhow. There weren’t many people left to move in bum-fuck nowhere South Australia. That’s what my brother called Sturtville: bum-fuck nowhere. He wasn’t exactly wrong. Sturtville consisted of opal miners, a high school of about fifty kids, a Woolies, and one sad little servo that sold over-priced fuel. That was our town. Village. Hole-in-the-ground. We didn’t have a lot in Sturtville (more than one doctor, for example) but there was one thing we had that no other place in Australia did. And that was Miriam Sykes.

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Blog, Gardens of War & Wasteland

what you need to know about gardens of war & wasteland: the ruptured sky

As the beta roll-out looms, it’s about time I had a sit-down with myself and addressed some of the important questions that you, the readers, have about my upcoming novel, Gardens of War & Wasteland: The Ruptured Sky.

GoWaW Promo copy
Li’Nea Wood: One of the many locales explored throughout Whyt’hallen. Images sourced from Pinterest.

Continue reading “what you need to know about gardens of war & wasteland: the ruptured sky”

Blog

the year that was & the year that will be

And so 2017 draws to a close. I for one can not be more relieved.

This year has been a tumultuous one indeed: I moved countries, got married, began a new day-job, bought my first car, and moved again (domestically this time); I said goodbye to my Grandmother, a second mother who raised me alongside my own; and lost two public figures (Chester Bennington and Kim Jonghyun), who have been a source of love, comfort and inspiration, to this terrible illness called depression, of which I also chronically suffer. It really has been all over the place–I have been all over the place. Personal rollercoaster aside, though, and my writing career(?) has been a pleasantly stable fixture. Let’s take a look.

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Book Reviews

ready player one

The biggest tragedy facing 2044 is that LGBTQI+ women of colour are still experiencing inequality to the point they need to masquerade as straight white boys in an online simulation.

ready-player-one-book-cover
Ready Player One? No. In fact, I’d very much like to quit.

I really don’t know what to say about this one. Although late to the party, my inner geek was excited to read Ready Player One due to the overwhelmingly positive reviews floating around the internet. Some even go as far as to laud it as the ‘best book ever’.

This is not one of those reviews.

Warning. There will be spoilers.

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Short Stories

the cottage on peppercorn tree hill

 

Peppercorn Tree HIll

The cottage on Peppercorn Tree Hill was not a cottage: it was a Federation Bungalow with a bay window and Evelyn Millar loved it. From the moment Harold drove her up the dusty road and she saw red brick façade with cream latticework under the eaves, Evie knew they would be happy here. The front was shaded with a large peppercorn tree, for which the hill was named, with a swollen trunk and wide-spanning limbs. Evie jumped out of the car, blonde curls bouncing, and breathed in the fresh country air. A smile curled her lips as she beheld her future looking down at the town below.

Evie and Harold met in a hospital, though neither was a patient. Her mother Vilma had been volunteering at the 113th Australian General Hospital to care for the many repatriated soldiers wounded in the Pacific. Together with her younger sister, Margaret, Evie spent much of her time there, helping where she could, while their father fought in Papua New Guinea. While assisting the nurses on their rounds, Evie happened upon a fresh-faced, fair-haired doctor by the name of Harold Millar. In spite of horror piling up around her, Evie fell in love.

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Blog

july recap

Hello again readers,

I’m excited to say that July has actually been an eventful month with life, reading and writing all moving along with leaps and bounds. Still haven’t managed to get a regular updating schedule on this things but I’m pretty optimistic August will see more content coming your way. Well then, let’s get into it.

Continue reading “july recap”