Book Reviews

the raven cycle

Never had I been so invested in a group of teenagers until I met Blue and her Raven Boys.

Ah, Maggie Stiefvater and The Raven Cycle.

Where do I begin without obscenely gushing all over the place? This series has raised the bar for YA fiction and given me a love for the genre which was previously only an occasional interest. Having annihilated all four books in the space of a month–a truly astounding feat for turtle-reader me–it’s safe to say The Raven Cycle shot straight to the top of my favourites and Stiefvater has well asserted herself as one of the premier authors of YA fiction.

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Book Reviews

the darkest part of the forest

Holly Black takes something so ordinary, so relatable to the modern adolescent, and juxtaposes it against the profoundly extraordinary.

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Stunning cover art is just one of the many positives about this book.

After a dismal run of DNF and one-star reads, Holly Black‘s The Darkest Part of the Forest was a pure delight. I have to confess, ten years ago, I never would have picked up this book: I was strictly a high-fantasy or slice-of-life contemporary literature kind of girl. I had no interest in magical realism or the blurring of lines between our world and others. What a wonderful thing personal growth is!

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Short Stories

the cottage on peppercorn tree hill

The cottage on Peppercorn Tree Hill was not a cottage: it was a Federation Bungalow with a bay window and Evelyn Millar loved it. From the moment Harold drove her up the dusty road and she saw red brick façade with cream latticework under the eaves, Evie knew they would be happy here. The front was shaded with a large peppercorn tree, for which the hill was named, with a swollen trunk and wide-spanning limbs. Evie jumped out of the car, blonde curls bouncing, and breathed in the fresh country air. A smile curled her lips as she beheld her future looking down at the town below.

Evie and Harold met in a hospital, though neither was a patient. Her mother Vilma had been volunteering at the 113th Australian General Hospital to care for the many repatriated soldiers wounded in the Pacific. Together with her younger sister, Margaret, Evie spent much of her time there, helping where she could, while their father fought in Papua New Guinea. While assisting the nurses on their rounds, Evie happened upon a fresh-faced, fair-haired doctor by the name of Harold Millar. In spite of horror piling up around her, Evie fell in love.

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Blog

july recap

Hello again readers,

I’m excited to say that July has actually been an eventful month with life, reading and writing all moving along with leaps and bounds. Still haven’t managed to get a regular updating schedule on this things but I’m pretty optimistic August will see more content coming your way. Well then, let’s get into it.

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Book Reviews

heart of mist

Heart of Mist fills the classic fantasy epic with a cast of wonderfully gritty characters and themes relevant to the modern-day reader.
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The stunning cover of Heart of Mist as revealed on Writer’s Edit. Source: http://www.writersedit.com

I was fortunate enough to have received an ARC of Helen Scheuerer‘s debut novel Heart of Mist, the first installment of her upcoming YA fantasy series, The Oremere Chronicles. Having read the prequel short stories available on her website for free, I had some idea of what to expect and the novel itself did not disappoint.

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Blog

may recap

Hello lovely readers~

How the hell is it June already? Now that we’ve reached the centrefold of the year I’ve decided to partake in the monthly recaps that are so popular among bloggers, if not for the sole purpose of having an excuse to update this thing. Yes, I’m lazy, I know. But May has been hectic. Let me tell you why.

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Gardens of War & Wasteland, Short Stories

the morning of

Ami watched the sun rise over the swell of mountains on the horizon. The golden arms of morning spread dawn’s embrace across the sleepy castle town below. The Holanian capital, Adria, would soon be waking. Her still-made feather bed beckoned, though she would not be joining it. The young princess sipped the wine left on the drawing table along with the remnants of her uneaten evening meal. The dark Bararnite vintage was a sharp assault so early in the morning but Ami welcomed the wetness on her tongue.

It was the Day of Blessing—a humble day of virginal simplicity to be enjoyed in the presence of her betrothed. A day of tradition, of ceremony, of celebration—a day Ami would not see through to completion. Had it been Tallas, she would have endured. Tallas, heir to the neighbouring throne of Bararn, had been her promised one, not his snivelling, unctuous little brother, Reminas. Even before Tallas’s cruel and untimely death, Reminas always believed himself entitled to everything his older brother possessed—his titles, his birthrights, his armies. Now he had the impudence to name himself successor to the Holanian marriage alliance as well. But he would not have Ami. She would not be Reminas’s bride. He would not be her king.

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